Jul 22, 2022 1 min read

Congressman Almost Stabbed While Campaigning To Fix N.Y.'s Crime Rate

The attempted stabbing and eventual release of the attacker show the inadequacies of New York’s current justice system.
Congressman Almost Stabbed While Campaigning To Fix N.Y.'s Crime Rate
Rep. Lee Zeldin 

Rep. Lee Zeldin (R-N.Y.) is running for New York Governor. He was attacked on the campaign trail.

What happened: Zeldin was campaigning near Rochester, New York. During a speech, a man approached him from the side and attempted to get a blade near the politician’s neck. After blocking the advance, the attacker held onto Zeldin’s arm, holding the blade to his wrist. “His words as he tried to stab me a few hours ago were ‘you’re done.’” Several attendees quickly tackled the attacker, and Zeldin remained unharmed.

Lee Zeldin had low expectations for New York’s criminal justice system. Soon after the attack, Zeldin wrote that “the attacker will likely be instantly released under NY’s laws.” He was right. According to the local Sherriff’s department, the attacker was “released on his own recognizance,” meaning no bail was involved.

The candidate just proved the top issue of his campaign. Under progressive criminal policies, New York has seen spiking crime, especially in the city. Zeldin’s top priority as governor would be to “Secure Our Streets,” which includes ending cashless bail, removing progressive district attorneys, and more policies to protect communities.

Big picture: Progressive criminal reform is a serious problem. Instead of protecting communities, local governments focus on minimizing incarceration and policing. The attempted stabbing and eventual release of the attacker show the inadequacies of New York’s current justice system.

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